User’s Guide, Chapter 3: Activities & Methodology

A variety of methodologies are used in both the Gender 101 design as well as the complimentary technical components. These diverse agendas enable full participation from the group, cater to a range of learning styles and provide an experiential learning environment for maximum results.

The following sections list each methodology separately with notes about why these can be effective methods, how they are best utilized, and which IGWG activities exist in each category for facilitator use. The shaded activities denote core sessions that are part of the prerequisite Gender 101 session.

Setting the Stage

These “ice-breaker” activities are essential for all workshops. They are used to accomplish several goals: encourage group participation from the very beginning, help the facilitator to gauge the “mood” of the room, help the facilitator gauge participants’ expectations for the workshop, set the right climate for the entire day, allow participants to bond with each other to allow for greater sharing of experiences in later sessions.

There are a dozens of sample “Vote with Your Feet” questions on the IGWG website. Facilitators can either draw from the list for one technical area, such as Safe Motherhood—or they can mix and match “Vote with Your Feet” questions from a variety of technical areas.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Welcome, Introductions, Review of Agenda

All

Vote With Your Feet, with examples bank

All

Developing a Shared Vocabulary

Definitions are important. For the remainder of the session and for USAID-related work moving forward, participants will need to be able to understand and use a specific set of vocabulary. Terms such as "transgender," "gender equity," and "empowerment" mean different things to different people. To move forward, and for the sake of dialogue throughout the workshop, there must be an agreement on the generally accepted definition of each term.

Definitions can be handed to a participant via a glossary handout or PowerPoint presentation. However, retention of new vocabulary is far greater if participants take an active role in discussing the definitions themselves.

Facilitators are encouraged to identify the vocabulary words necessary for discussion during their session, and include a definition activity early in the workshop. Groups of suggested vocabulary words can be found under each “available training” link. It is recommended that each agenda not include more than 10 vocabulary words, or the session will run on too long and participants may lose interest.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Definitions

All

The Gender Game

All

What do we mean by GBV?

GBV

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Definitions and Myths, Part A

Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

Expository Activities

These “groundwork” activities allow participants to begin thinking about such difficult subjects such as gender, gender-based violence, sexuality, and social norms—and how these subject impact health and health programming. They are critical in allowing participants the opportunity to ponder new ideas, challenge widely-held norms and beliefs, and open their mind to outside opinions and perspectives. In day-to-day work, people rarely have the opportunity to discuss theory. Thus, expository activities are designed to allow participants to put their daily responsibilities aside and open their minds to new ideas and possible interventions. Expository activities encourage dialog and creative discourse.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Act Like a Man, Act Like a Woman

All

Images of Male and Female Roles

All

Myths and Realities: GBV

GBV

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Definitions and Myths, Part B

Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

Life Cycle of GBV

GBV

How is GBV Perpetuated at Different Levels?

GBV

Shaping our Sexualities: Sexual and Gender Norms

Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

What is Sexuality?

Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

Content-Based Lecturettes

The term “facilitation” suggests that the information already exists within the group members, and thus answers can be found through probing questions and group work. As typical audiences are of experienced professionals, IGWG training modules attempt to facilitate in all possible situations. But sometimes, conceptual frameworks and information about USAID regulations are best communicated by a straight lecture or PowerPoint presentation. With the correct preparations, these presentations can continue to engage participants by encouraging questions and dialogue about slides—as well as communicate new information to the group. The following lecturettes have corresponding PowerPoint presentations within each technical area link on the IGWG site.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Why Engage Men and Boys?

CME

How Prevalent is GBV? What are its RH Consequences?

GBV

Intro to Gender and Safe Motherhood

S-Motherhood

Brainstorming/Guided Discussions

This methodology allows for group learning, but with a guided outcome. Participants are encouraged to work together to discover their own results, but at the end of the activity, it is appropriate for the facilitator to add some additional information. Whereas expository activities are grounded in opinion and new ideas, the brainstorming/guided discussion activities look for some sort of learned outcome. Wrap-up to these activities should be handled delicately; facilitators do not want to appear critical of or disappointed in participant results. Rather they should make additional suggestions or pose additional processing questions to help the group get to their anticipated end result.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Gender, Justice and the Home; Gender, Justice and the Community

CME

Why Does She Stay? Video and Discussion

GBV

How Gender Affects Safe Motherhood Across the Life Cycle

S-Motherhood

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Gender in USAID’s Automated Directives System (ADS)

Gender

Addressing GBV through USAID’s Health Programs (PPT)

GBV

Gender Continuum (with “Examples Bank”)

Gender

Frameworks for Engaging Men (with Case Studies)

CME

Types of CME Intervention Activities

CME

Action Planning

All

Action Planning: Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

Gender, Sexuality, and HIV

Programmatic Guidance

Many of the participants for IGWG trainings come from a technical perspective. Whereas they might find theory interesting, they are most engaged when they have the opportunity to directly apply new knowledge to their current work. Therefore, the following activities were designed to allow participants to see what gender integration looks like and for participants to work in groups to think through the application of new concepts and brainstorm ways to improve future programs using specific examples and cases.

Gender Analysis and Integration

These are a specific set of frameworks and methods for participants to use in order to integrate gender components into their projects and programs. The Programmatic Guidance presentations and tools assist participants with the what, while the Gender Analysis and Integration activities will help participants with the how.

Title of Activity

Relevant to the following technical areas:

Problem Tree

All

Introduction to Gender Analysis and Integration (with bank of case studies in each area)

All

Gender Analysis for HIV

Gender, Sexuality and HIV

Gender Integration Exercise for GBV

GBV

Overview of Principles and Elements of Gender Integration

Gender Integration

Integrating Gender Throughout the Program Cycle

Gender Integration

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